India's Nuclear Posturing

Time is ripe to change over to NEED BASED FIRST USE. Blind, deaf and mute Indian military strategists must open their eyes and ears but keep their mouth shut and witness what is happening around the world.


India's Nuclear Posturing

BACKGROUND

Time and tide waits for none. I sincerely hope that in the closed confines of NSA/PMO offices hectic deliberations are going on to re-examine our outdated and strategically useless stance on use of nukes based on idealistic and utterly flawed myopic philosophy of NO FIRST USE.

Time is ripe to change over to NEED BASED FIRST USE. Blind, deaf and mute Indian military strategists must open their eyes and ears but keep their mouth shut and witness what is happening around the world. The original article clearly enunciating South Korean President making his intent clear to acquire CURRENCY OF POWER, the NUKES for national security. I am posting what I wrote 18 years ago but the Indian Ignoramuses do not pay heed. Link of the same given below:

No First Use Of Nukes: An Outdated And Invalid Option

South Korea considers nuclear weapons

President Yoon Suk Yeol of South Korea said that the country would weigh building its own nuclear weapons, or asking the U.S. to redeploy them on the Korean Peninsula, if North Korea’s nuclear threat worsens.

His comments marked the first time that a South Korean president officially mentioned arming the country with nuclear weapons since the U.S. removed its nuclear munitions from the South in 1991. Surveys in recent years have shown that a majority of South Koreans support such a move.

Yoon added that building nuclear weapons was not yet an official policy, and that South Korea would for now strengthen its alliance with the U.S. to discourage the North’s nuclear acceleration.

Context: North Korea has vowed to expand its nuclear arsenal, and in 2022 the country tested more missiles than any previous year. The provocations have led some members of Yoon’s conservative People Power Party to call for Seoul to reconsider a nuclear option.

History: South Korea embarked on a covert nuclear weapons program in the 1970s, but abandoned it after the U.S. promised to keep the South under its nuclear umbrella. South Korea is a signatory of the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty, which bans it from seeking nuclear weapons.

TOP

🎉 You've successfully subscribed to Mission Victory India!
OK